Mind the Gap: Connectivity wins over affordability

By Drew Aspinwall One of my London-based colleagues told me that the Northern Line extension (NLE) to Battersea Power Station had opened on Monday. Not living in the city myself, the interesting part of this piece of transport news was that the extension had been financed in part by the private sector, including the developers…

New Affordable Housing Programme: 300,000 homes a year still looks a long way off

By Paddy Kent Earlier this month, the former-Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government (now the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC)) announced £8.6 billion to build 120,000 new affordable homes in England over the next five years.  £5.2 billion will be managed outside London by Homes England, whilst the GLA will administer…

Movin’ on Up – with or without local government?

By Laura Griffiths Amidst all the reshuffle news from Number 10 last week, we also saw a rebrand from Ministry to Department. The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government is no more and has transformed into the Department of Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC). Severed is the formal link between local and national…

Let’s (not) go al-fresco

By Rebecca Coleman Something decidedly un-European is occurring at Westminster Council. In the past two weeks they have announced that plans to install temporary pedestrian piazzas at the most congested parts of Oxford Street will no longer go ahead, as well as the news that al-fresco dining will cease at the end of the month….

Purpose on Payday

By Andrew Adie September has been the month when the ‘road to COP26’ moved up a gear. Shuttle diplomacy, which has been conducted behind the scenes to try and ensure that the carbon reduction commitments needed to deliver the Paris targets are agreed, morphed into public pronouncements about efforts to decarbonise. Boris Johnson’s UN speech…

Countdown to COP26

By Devi Santosh This week has seen a flurry of diplomatic activity around carbon reduction commitments, as outlined in our political blog, and also a combination of carrot and stick messages from global organisations who are looking at corporate environmental behaviour. On the political side, we’ve seen that diplomacy can move some mountains (even if greater…

Getting back to the art of gathering at RESI 2021

By Laura Leggetter Having attended one of the first in-person property events for some time at Celtic Manor last week, I was just about to press send on a blog I had written on the housing market when Robert Jenrick was pushed from his post. My scribbles from his keynote at RESI were all of…

The Prime Minister and Kermit fall out

By Aimee Howard In a speech yesterday at the 76th Session of the United General Assembly, Prime Minister  Johnson has alleged the COP26 summit, only 40 days away, will be “the turning point for humanity. We must show that we are capable of learning, and maturing, and finally taking responsibility for the destruction we are…

Why the SEC’s crypto ruling has global ramifications

By Ian Silvera Regulators are somewhat of an odd bunch. They’re often secretive, sometimes a bit awkward and you may never hear from them in years until they pop-up and become omnipresent. Such is the case with crypto and the world’s financial regulators. For the blockchain industry, 2021 is the year of scrutiny and arguably…

What is needed next for our education system?

By Rob Williams Robert will receive his award as 2020 Secondary Head Teacher of the Year tomorrow.  He has kindly taken the time to set out his thoughts on what our education system needs from the new Secretary of State.  Congratulations and thank you, Robert. “As we say goodbye to one Secretary of State and…